Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Studio Spotlight With Guest Artist Jason Twiggy Lott

Over the course of ten Wednesday's join me in welcoming 10 guest artists as they share a glimpse into the spaces that foster their creative process. One of our ten guest bloggers referred to the artist's studio as "Sacred Space", and indeed it is just that for me. Working in the silence of my own studio is the place I am most easily able to connect to my Creator. As our guest artists share images of their own sacred spaces, they tell a bit of their creative process through the answers to four simple questions. Read about the artist in their bio and then explore the links each one will provide to get to know them a little more.

I don't remember if I saw Jason Twiggy Lott's work first on Pinterest, or Facebook, or his website, or somewhere else on line. It doesn't really matter - what I do remember is being moved deeply, not quite in a take my breath away feeling, more like in a punch that knocked the wind out sort of way. Jason's work, whether it is his assemblage, or his mixed media, or his paintings, or his photography, hits me between the eyes and right in the heart. It leaves me gasping, searching, wondering, and wanting to know more. The level of professionalism in his compositions speaks to the fine art lover in me, while his choice of material and subject matter can be gritty and raw and emotionally charged. At once a story I recognize and yet altogether unfamiliar. 

Jason sent me a folder with shots of his studio and told me to choose what I wanted to show you today. Does it make me greedy if I wanted to use them all? 

Well call me greedy then, because that is exactly what I did! Really, be sure to check out the link to his website at the bottom as well, it is a virtual feast for your senses. 


Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
1. What is your favorite time of day to create and why?

I don’t necessarily have a particular time of day that seems to be peak hours of creativity. I’m a freelance graphic designer and furniture maker in addition to an artist. Those two occupations usually wind up paying the bills. As romantic and noble as it may sound to truly be a starving artist, I do like having a home, humble as it may be, and a studio to work in. Those of course come with bills. Therefore, my artwork production typically revolves around my graphic design and furniture business schedules. It’s unfortunate that my artwork often must be pushed to the back burner, but that’s just the way my life is structured for now. If I have an upcoming art show, there typically comes a crunch time for artwork production a few weeks before the show. I do find that the necessity of meeting a deadline plays into both my creative output and inspiration. When I’m under the gun, I produce work and I produce it well.

Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
2. What do you love most about your studio?

Currently I just love the fact that my studio space isn’t in my home. There was a time that I had to produce my work out of my apartment which is cramped to say the least. I like living in a small space, but I also like having more room to produce my art away from my living space. Having a separate space that is strictly for work helps me stay focused. I’ve been blessed to now have a great studio space that I share with two friends and collaborators.

Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
Jason Twiggy Lott Studio

3. What can always be found in your work space?

Assorted reference books on topics including ancient alchemy, symbolism, religious doctrine, and modern art.
A large assortment of bits and pieces for my assemblage work like scrap metal and wood, bones, antique photographs, and large quantities of aging paper products.
Various trinkets and religious icons that I find beautiful and inspiring.

Jason Twiggy Lott Studio

Jason Twiggy Lott Studio
4. What dream supply would you purchase if money were no issue? - or alternatively – what medium would you want to learn if time were no issue?

I’ll answer both.
If money were no object, I’d have a hell of a lot more oil paints. They’re expensive for me and so are reserved for portrait painting which I typically do on a small scale. I’d like to be able to paint on a much larger scale with oil paints, but alas, I can’t afford to do so for now.

If time were not a factor, I’d do many things as far as mediums go. Firstly, I would seek some professional instruction in oil painting. It’s a relatively new medium for me and I’ve mostly just made up techniques myself. I’d love to get a solid education in traditional oil painting techniques. Additionally, encaustic is something I’ve always wanted to learn about, but haven’t had the time to jump into it. 


Jason Twiggy Lott Studio

Part of Jason's Statement from his website:
"So much of the trash I find and use was once very significant to someone, but they lost it, discarded it, or forgot it. Does that negate its significance? Do we as people become less special if we’re lost or discarded? Does our past define us? Are we innately significant and special beings or is our significance dependent on how we’re remembered once we’re gone? Ultimately, my work speaks to our fundamental understanding of the human condition, as well as our lack thereof. What we leave behind can say as much about the present as it does about the past."

Jason Twiggy Lott Studio

9 comments:

  1. Wowowow! That website is a new bookmark. Studying its pages is an art class. It nice to see that he has his fingers in many pots...
    Great selection and well done, Crystal...Laura

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    1. I really love that his style is so consistent across all the medium's he uses. Ethereal and dreamlike snippets of another world. Thanks for stopping to read and leave your comment today Laura!

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  2. I discovered Jason about 3 years ago...and likewise was blown away by his compositions...his attention to detail is astounding. Thanks for a glimpse inside his space and his process...

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    1. Thanks for stopping by today!

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  3. Thanks for sharing Jason's studio space with us. I met Jason a number of years back and featured him in my book. It is great to learn a bit more about him and see where he creates his incredible work.

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    1. I was so excited to see he was a part of the book Seth. Lucky you for having had the opportunity to meet Jason!

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  4. I have not been to Jason's website before, looking forward to perusing it. Thanks!

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    1. You are in for a treat Pam! Thanks for the comment!

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  5. what an interesting artist and studio, thank you for sharing Jason's studio and a glimpse of his work with us!

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